Three Reasons to Always Use a Rain Cover

Here are three reasons (other than rain) to have your running backpack cover – aka the rain cover – on at all times.

1. To be seen from far away

Most running backpacks these days come with an integrated cover. Make sure the cover has reflective bands, and is of a visible colour. Reflective bands on a backpack cover can be spotted by a car driver from farther away than most portable electric lights.  Avoid dark backpack covers.

2. To catch loose gear

In the past 10 years, my backpack cover has saved me from losing my cellphone, and even my wallet. Not that often, maybe just once or twice, but losing your wallet even once is not something I wish on anyone. These side pockets are very handy, but sometimes, when you decide to push the machine, things will shift, a zipper may come loose, and stuff starts falling out. Having your cover on will save you lots of trouble.

3. Because it is snowing!

Yes, snow will eventually make everything wet on the inside of your pack if you stay outside long enough.

That’s it! An other good reason to always have it on is to be ready at all times when the rain starts coming down.

Happy run commute!

By |2019-01-27T09:00:24+00:00January 27th, 2019|Categories: Gear, General|0 Comments

Run Commuting Tights Fit to Face a Canadian Winter

If you run commute year-round above the 49th parallel, you most likely have a variety of thermal tights. Up until this year, finding a pair that performed well below -20°C/-4°F proved to be tricky (at least for me) unless I was ready to spend lots of money. However, Mountain Equipment Co-op came out with a great new set of tights this year that solves my dilemma: the MEC Flyer Tight.

Source: Mountain Equipment Co-op

The front panel is made of wind-blocking nylon, polyester, spandex, and blended with polyurethane. The back is slightly different, composed of nylon and spandex, with a soft-brushed fleece interior.

Having now used these for the past 2 weeks, I am extremely pleased with the way they keep me warm, even in the coldest weather (-22°C/-8°F). Despite being thicker than most thermal tights, they did not impede my range of motion. That said, the idea behind these tights (front and back panel made of different materials) is not new, but their price make them a real steal: $82 CAD (about $58 USD).

In the same category: Sugoi Firewall 180 Zap tights, $209 CAD ($148 USD)

Modified Running Gloves

A friend, with whom I often run commute, owns a pair of Nike running gloves, which also have a mitt cover for colder days. I have been trying to get a pair of these for many years and just recently found a similar product at MEC. Reviews were not good for the product though, but they were at a discount, so I went for them. I quickly found out why: the mitt cover seams let go after the second day.

I could have taken them back to MEC for a refund, but I decided to go another way: I went to my local shoe repair shop. For a minimal cost, they readily fixed them, and they will be good for many run commuting years to come.

My local shoe repair shop, Cordonnerie Chez Gerry.

Salomon Fast Wing Hoodie

For the past 10 years, I swore by soft shell jackets for winter running. However, last fall was very mild, so I kept my Salomon Fast Wing Hoodie around longer than usual, which led to trying it out in cold temperatures. With the proper base and mid-layers, it turned out to be a very good fit, even in temperatures as cold as -20°C/-4°F. Not only does it work well, but it is half the weight of my soft shell.

Source: www.salomon.com