Roll away your wrinkles

It occurred to me as I titled this post that you, dear reader, will now see banner ads wherever Internaut takes you, proclaiming Housewife in East Cupcake finds miracle trick to smooth her face! and Follow this one simple rule to avoid crows’ feet! and so forth. But I write not of laugh lines and the folds in one’s turkey neck, but of slacks and shirts: jamming them in your backpack and arriving wrinkle-free (well … wrinkle-light) at work.

In short: roll them. To begin, make a few folds, as shown in the photograph below. Keep your slacks/pants/khakis/trousers/dungarees/skirts (no jeggings) flat as can be; fold them in half lengthwise, along the crotch/crack axis, then in half horizontally, at the knees. Fold the sleeves back on your dress shirts. If you don’t know how to fold a shirt, follow these instructions. Leave the collar folded up, as pictured below; however, you will want your shirt lying on its face. Smooth any small wrinkles or blips from your garments.

A few folds gets you ready to roll.

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By |2016-10-22T20:26:50-04:00February 15th, 2012|Categories: How To|Tags: , , , , |5 Comments

Small Numbers Really Add Up – Stephanie’s Dec-2011 Run Commuter Stats

December was my first month run commuting and I logged plenty of miles doing it.  Check out this image of my month-long mileage log below.  Add the total 47.81-miles of run commuting to some long weekend runs (not listed, but included a 10K and half-marathon race) and it’s clearly possible to keep up running skills over the winter months.  Look at that Total Calories number – 4,751 calories burned.  Pass the butter, please!  With numbers like these, a runner can enjoy the outdoors while running and the indoor indulgences of tasty food.

If you breakdown the large monthly mileage into the individual runs, the small numbers really accumulate.  The shortest run, 1.62-miles on December-16, helped add to a 4.17-mile day and a 9.08-mile week.  That’s no small task when you think of all the holiday shopping and get-togethers we attend throughout December, a characteristically chaotic month.

To track these numbers, I use the iPhone iMapMyRUN app and that image was lifted from the MapMyRun website.  The app’s GPS locates quickly in the morning, I drop the phone in my pocket, and I’m off running.   On the weekends, I use a Garmin Forerunner 305 to track my running.  TRC’s Josh uses a 305 too; check out his gear post.  The 305 easily tracks heart-rate, pace, splits, grade, mileage, and probably other things I can’t remember right now.  However, it can take 5 or so minutes to locate the GPS satellites.  In the morning, when I have limited time or it’s just too cold, I don’t want to stand outside before a run and wait.  So the app is really my go-to run commuter mileage tracker.  It doesn’t track pace as easily as I would like and doesn’t log heart-rate, but I have found the simplicity of using the app works best for me during my daily grind.  And here’s the outcome:

Here’s to logging even more run commuter miles in January-2012!

Getting Started – Part 5: From Sweaty to Office Ready

We have enjoyed great interest and discussion since we began this endeavor, but we truly knew we were going somewhere when we got our first public criticism. Rather, I should say our first public concern: hygiene; more specifically, co-workers’ exposure to our assuredly horrendous hygiene. One Reddit reader voiced it thus:

“Anyone who would run commute to their office without showering before they begin work is an inconsiderate ass hole. You think your coworkers want to smell your sweaty crotch all day long? … Yeah, that’s usually the kind of attitude ‘that guy’ has about his poor hygiene.”

First off, asshole is one word. More over: I am about the sweatiest runner you could find; in anything over 70 degrees, you are likely to hear my shoes squish as my mileage climbs into the teens; yet I am also very finicky about my grooming, and I assure you, dear readers, no co-worker nor compatriot has ever had a whiff of my tender bits. I will explain how you can run to work, even in the height of Atlanta’s sweltering summer months (all eight of them), yet still achieve a rosy glow and pleasing scent around the office.

NOTE: Some will certainly say this is gender biased toward men, for whom hasty grooming might be considered easier. As with bicycling, we have heard concerns from ladies of their hair becoming a fright. I let my tumbleweed hair grow 14 months, 11 of them in 2011. I hear you on the hair; I will give the best advice I can. If any female run commuters have ought advice to add, fire away!

 1. Start your day with a shower
Breakfast is the most important meal of the day; showering is a crucial aspect of your morning ritual, too, especially if you seek to stanch the lurking workplace crotch-scent some purport to fear. Ready as you normally do. Gentlemen, shave what you want or must. Put on deodorant and lotion. Brush your teeth. Comb your hair. Stand up straight. Smile.

As my hair increased in volume (better measured thus than in length, curly as it is), especially in humid summer, I wore a hat. I hate wearing hats but I must admit this helped. My hair was sweaty but it remained tangle-free. (It also reduced my wind resistance.)

2. Planning is everything: gather your goods
Before you set out from home, know what you need for the day, and know that you have it. I typically gather everything on our bed, then view my accrued items as I mentally dress myself and plot my day’s events: socks; underpants; trousers; undershirt; shirt; belt; sweater (December and January); lunch box; BlackBerry; notebook; camera; and so forth. Then go over it again as you pack your bag.

This is the most crucial part of the process. I have several times neglected to bring a belt, or socks, and a few times my lunch. The belt is the only thing that aggravates me. You will find it difficult to maintain a professional demeanor when you are manually holding up your pants.

Stoke 19 Contents - Smaller


3. Leave or keep at the office whatever you are able
Just as there is little need to daily haul dress shoes to and from work (I keep two pairs of shoes under my desk: black oxfords and saddle oxfords), it is not always necessary to pack your dress clothes in and out. It will lighten your load, and also leave you with room enough to cart home, say, a 5-pound box of strawberries you obtained from the fruit vendor outside your office, which you can then in turn present to your sweetheart. (This happened.)

On a day I bicycle to work, I might bring several clean pairs of pants and shirts along. I always wear undershirts, so I can get two wears out of each shirt, and about as many from the pants. I keep most of my ties at work. Find an empty drawer in your desk, a filing cabinet, or some abandoned cubicle; use it like a dresser drawer.

I could really use some more blue or purple shirts.

(Again, ladies, I am sorry: this is gentleman-specific advice. Your ways are truly a mystery to me and I have little idea how to transport dresses or wrinkle-sensitive garments, or outfit-specific shoes. Perhaps plan an outfit well in advance, specifically for run commute days; haul those in.)

NOTE: I keep two pairs of emergency socks at the office. I have learned over the last year or so that I am most likely to forget socks, if I forget anything. Black, gray, or zany argyle are my choices.

4. Shower if one is available; if not, take a bird bath
This is the crucial step toward avoiding stink. I now employ the term “bird bath” rather than “whore’s bath,” as the latter earned some quizzical looks from a few co-workers. Turns out I hadn’t offended them in explaining my methods; they thought I had said “horror bath” (syllables and consonants are subject to wide interpretation in Georgia), but I still wish to avoid giving offense, in sense and scents.

You can easily obtain everything you need for a quick clean-up: soap; deodorant; shampoo; comb; baby wipes; foot powder; lotion. Look in the travel/sample section of your favorite grocery or department store. Check, too, for a little bag in which to keep them; stash that in your filing-turned-dresser drawer.

All signs point to spring-time freshness.

Except in the sweatiest of months, I typically eschew the full-on sink bathing experience, instead washing my face, neck, and behind my ears (the salt really gathers there), and wetting and resetting my hair. I do these in the single-occupant, lockable restroom down the hall; however, I have at times tended to superficial clean-up in shared-access restrooms. My curly (wavy when short) hair pretty much takes care of itself. Most days, typically fall through spring, I simply tend to salt- and scent-sensitive areas with baby wipes. After a great deal of field testing, I find Huggies wipes to be supreme.

Put it all together, and you can go from something like this:


… to something like this:

If you can take a better self-portrait of a 6’4″ man when the tallest object in your office is 4 feet tall, I would like to hear how.

(No need for you to look surly, though, and I am very peppy; however, Josh mandated that we never smile, and I abide by it.)

5. Practice makes perfect
When changing your commute to bike or foot, you should one weekend plot and time your route to work. Too, I encourage you to practice readying after returning home from a weekend run. This will give you a sense of how long it might take you, what items you will need in order to complete your transformation, and the general process through which specifically you must go; you will be able to tailor this advice to your routine.

6. If you lack a private office, share a work space, or lack storage
Many offices have drop ceilings. Find a remote panel, possibly in a lockable bathroom or above a stall, perhaps even in a closet, and stash your kit up there. I have done this and it works. I got the idea from Neal Stephenson’s Snow Crash.

7. If you remain concerned about stinking:

 

By |2016-10-22T20:26:51-04:00December 29th, 2011|Categories: How To, BecomingARunCommuter|Tags: , , , , , |30 Comments

In The News: The Flintstone Commute

The Real Flintstones

The Real Flintstones

A reporter for the Arts and Life section of The Daily, an iPad-exclusive national e-newspaper, recently delved into the mysterious – nay, ‘prehistoric’ – world of run commuting, even going so far as trying it himself for two weeks.  Now that’s dedication that we here at TRC can appreciate.

Bill Bradley interviewed long distance run commuter, Bob Heskovitz, who shared some solid tips on running to work.  In addition to the article, Bradley reviewed a few of the smaller running backpacks, too, including the Osprey Manta 20.

Article: The Flintstone Commute: Running to work is good for your health and your schedule

Pack Reviews: The Right Stuff

National Run@Work Day Announcement!

The Road Runners Club of America’s Run@Work Day is quickly approaching!   Since we’re really into run commuting around here, we wanted to have a day of our own, but in the spirit of all kinds of running, we’ve decided to combine it with the already-scheduled celebration on September 16th.

watch?v=qg676HuVSRI

In addition to scheduling a run with coworkers during the day at work or planning a quick jog at the end of the day, why not start planning on running to or from work that day?  Maybe you could lead a small group after work, winding through neighborhoods and dropping runners off where they live as you make your own way home?  Maybe you can do a post-work pub run, hang around for a drink and then run to your house afterwards?  In any case, it’s the perfect excuse to give run commuting a try for the first time!

If you have any questions or are just starting out and need some advice, leave a comment or you can send us an email at theruncommuter@gmail.com.

Heads up: Run@Work Day – September 16, 2011

Well, September is finally here and we just wanted to let everyone know about The Road Runners Club of America’s Run@Work day coming up in a couple of weeks.

The goal of RUN@WORK Day, presented by the Road Runners Club of America, is to encourage adults to get 30-minutes of exercise each day, in accordance with the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, either before work, during lunch, or immediately following work.  RUN@WORK Day also encourages companies to help employees schedule time for physical activity. Incorporating exercise into one’s daily routine can markedly improve one’s overall physical health.

If you’re interested, think about what you could do to get your coworkers around the office up and moving that day and also encourage them to start regularly exercising.  RRCA even has a poster you can utilize for promoting your event.

We’ll be posting some additional info in the coming week.

TRC

By |2016-09-09T16:08:27-04:00September 1st, 2011|Categories: News|Tags: , , , |0 Comments