About stephaniedevlin

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far stephaniedevlin has created 4 blog entries.

How to Arrive at Work Wrinkle- and Stain-Free

How do I keep my work clothes from getting wrinkled is a question I have been asked a lot regarding run commuting.  Each run commuter carries different items to and from work depending on their access to showers or enough storage at work (e.g., TRC posts: Josh & Kyle).  In this blog post, I’d like to share with readers my technique for making it to my work cubical without looking like I ran in.

Each day, I carry my work clothes, heels, undergarments and, often, lunch to work in my backpack.  The solution to keeping my clothes wrinkle- and lunch-free is a combination of laundry garment bags and an extra plastic bag around the food container.  Laundry garment bags are light-weight cloth bags used to protect delicate items in the wash. They are inexpensive and can be purchased in almost every super market near the laundry detergent.  An alternative to the garment bags would be to use other cloth or plastic bags.

wrinkle-free clothes
My work attire typically includes dry-cleaned slacks, work top, cardigan, undergarments, and a pair of shoes.  The clothes packing process follows this order, as pictured:

step 1 – obtain laundry garment bags

step 2 – lay out clothes

step 3 – roll clothes up like a stromboli (e.g., Kyle’s TRC post)

step 4 – wrap the clothes roll in the garment bag

I have even carried a suit jacket using this method and arrived at meetings wrinkle-free.  Rolling the clothes and placing them in a garment bag helps to give the clothes more strength and form, so they do not crumple in the backpack.  Additionally, the garment bag adds a bit of protection from spills in the backpack if you’re carrying toiletries, food, or from an unexpected rain soaking.

Shoes don’t really wrinkle, but I still place them in a shoe bag.  The bag was free and protects the shoes from potential spills and protects my clothes and lunch from my dirty shoes.

lunch-free clothes
Pick a sturdy container to put the food in, wrap it up in an extra plastic bag, and place it at the bottom of your backpack.  If the container spills, gravity will help the food stay away from your clothes.  If the container is on top, gravity will do everything to get the food all over your clothes.
Yes, this is soup.  I have successfully run commuted with soup in my pack.

final stages
This is what my daily backpack load looks like:

All my shower needs are pre-staged at work, so I shower and pull myself all together.  Here’s the final product, at work and wrinkle-free:

Taking this photo was the most difficult part of this blog post.  It was hard for me to look at the mirror and click the button at the same time, so hard in fact, I forgot to smile!  Here’s what you missed:   :D

I hope this post helps a few ladies and gents stay stylish at work without sacrificing sportiness during their commute.

Small Numbers Really Add Up – Stephanie’s Dec-2011 Run Commuter Stats

December was my first month run commuting and I logged plenty of miles doing it.  Check out this image of my month-long mileage log below.  Add the total 47.81-miles of run commuting to some long weekend runs (not listed, but included a 10K and half-marathon race) and it’s clearly possible to keep up running skills over the winter months.  Look at that Total Calories number – 4,751 calories burned.  Pass the butter, please!  With numbers like these, a runner can enjoy the outdoors while running and the indoor indulgences of tasty food.

If you breakdown the large monthly mileage into the individual runs, the small numbers really accumulate.  The shortest run, 1.62-miles on December-16, helped add to a 4.17-mile day and a 9.08-mile week.  That’s no small task when you think of all the holiday shopping and get-togethers we attend throughout December, a characteristically chaotic month.

To track these numbers, I use the iPhone iMapMyRUN app and that image was lifted from the MapMyRun website.  The app’s GPS locates quickly in the morning, I drop the phone in my pocket, and I’m off running.   On the weekends, I use a Garmin Forerunner 305 to track my running.  TRC’s Josh uses a 305 too; check out his gear post.  The 305 easily tracks heart-rate, pace, splits, grade, mileage, and probably other things I can’t remember right now.  However, it can take 5 or so minutes to locate the GPS satellites.  In the morning, when I have limited time or it’s just too cold, I don’t want to stand outside before a run and wait.  So the app is really my go-to run commuter mileage tracker.  It doesn’t track pace as easily as I would like and doesn’t log heart-rate, but I have found the simplicity of using the app works best for me during my daily grind.  And here’s the outcome:

Here’s to logging even more run commuter miles in January-2012!

Traffic Report

Terry:   “Now we turn to Stephanie, our W-TRC traffic reporter. How’s it look out there, Stephanie?”

Stephanie:   “It’s a pretty typical commute out here, Terry. We’ll start with the roads. Drivers, we have delays due to a crash and car fire on the inner loop of the beltway and a resulting gaper delay on the outer loop. The Thruway is jammed due to a jackknifed tractor-trailer. Authorities are on their way and only the shoulder is getting by at the moment. Expect delays on the interstate as the tolls increased today by 50¢ and the fast-toll lanes are malfunctioning. A tech is on the scene. Watch out as the cross-connector highway is running slowly in both directions; kind of strange for this time of day. Finally, everyone is scrambling over to the local roads due to troubled highways, so the overflow is making them slow.

“On the City Transit Trains there are delays on the North-South line due to unscheduled track maintenance. The East-West lines are also slow due to a water-main break near the tracks. The drivers have turned off the auto-driver program through the wet area, so manual driving is causing delays. And there’s a cracked rail outside the City Center station; they are single-tracking it through there. Riders should also check the City Transit website for a large number of escalator and elevator outages.

“Finally, Bike and Run Commuters, it’s all clear for you. Go get out there.”

Night Safety (that includes dusk and dawn, people)

Hi all,  I’m Stephanie and I’m new to The Run Commuter community, but I’m already hooked! I wanted to share my thoughts about night safety, since nothing has been blogged on the topic yet.

The shorter daylight hours of the winter months forces many runners onto the streets, sidewalks, and maybe even a bit of trails during non-daylight hours. This adds extra elements to runner safety. Vehicles have a harder time seeing you and the runner may have a harder time seeing potential dangers. This blog post is to give everyone a few ideas as to how to mentally and physically gear-up for these extra concerns. My expertise is admittedly limited. I am a scientist by profession, a running hobbyist, and luckily have no real-life experience with “unknown dangers.” However, I am my father’s daughter, so I’m a worry-wart who is constantly thinking of my safety. My love of running outdoors, loathing of treadmills, boredom of lunchtime runs, and horror at losing my running skills over the winter makes me conquer my fears and run in the dark. Sometimes I run both to and from work in the dark or dusk-ish light depending on celestial positioning and my work schedule. Below I describe the gear I carry and the things I do to stay safe out there. (more…)

Translate »