Josh

About Josh

Editor-in-Chief of The Run Commuter by night, paralegal by day. Father of three boys. Husband to the world's greatest bicycle advocate. Avid runner. Lover of beer and urban gardening. Can be found running with a backpack around the streets of Atlanta, Georgia. Contact Josh at info@theruncommuter.com

The New Run Commuters – August 2015

After a long hiatus, The New Run Commuters is back! This month we feature Jeff Jones of Atlanta, Georgia.

Jeff actually contacted us a couple of years ago and said he and his wife were moving to Atlanta from the Pacific Northwest, and one of the criteria he had while looking for a new home was that it would (ideally) be close enough to work that he could run commute. Now, he’s all settled in and acclimatized to the never-ending heat and humidity of the Southeast, and has finished a full year of run commuting.

To top it off, Jeff just recently ran the Barrel-to-Keg 70-miler as a solo runner and finished in an amazing 14 hours and 47 minutes! He attributes his success to two-a-day run commutes (as well as a high fat/protein diet.)

As always, if you are interested in being featured in The New Run Commuters, contact us using the form at the end of this post. The only criteria we have is that you started run commuting sometime in the last year or so. 

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Runner Basics

  • Name: Jeff Jones
  • Age: 41
  • City/State: Atlanta, GA
  • Profession/Employer: Finance/Verizon Wireless
  • Number of years running: 5
  • Number of races you participate in a year: 5 – 6
  • Do you prefer road or trail? I enjoy both – the predictability and intensity of a nice hard road run and the low impact and mellow vibes from trail runs.

Run Commuting Gear

On Run Commuting

Why did you decide to start run commuting?

I thrive on complex logistical challenges, and run commuting seemed to align with my goals. When my family moved to North Atlanta about a year and a half ago, we decided to buy/rent within 6 miles of work so I could run commute. We even reduced down to one vehicle when we moved which forces me to run just about everyday.

I also wanted to set an example for my kids (5 and 8) whom I hope will never have to learn how to drive a car (may public transit, autonomous cars, and human powered commuting be in all of our futures)

How often do you run commute?

I run commute year-round, 5 days a week (usually for a total of 8 – 10 runs per week,) in sub-freezing temps, thunderstorms and the hottest stuff Atlanta can serve up.

How far is your commute?

6 – 10 miles depending on the route, sometimes a run through Vickery Creek Trails or down the Greenway tempts me away from a direct route home.

Do you pack or buy a lunch?

Pack my lunch 4 days a week, food truck Friday!

What do you like most about run commuting?

For me it’s about work/life balance – being able to do 45 minutes to an hour of running each way gets my exercise done for the day and I can spend time with family. Additionally, after a couple miles into the run you settle into that flow state and life’s problems/stress just work themselves out.

Do you know of anyone else in your area that runs to work?

I think I’m probably the only run commuter I know of in North Atlanta – I’d love to have some company though ;-)

When not run commuting, how do you get to work?

My wife picks me up usually just once a week. Otherwise it’s that or Uber if I have to make exception. I am fortunate enough to have a great team at work who has graciously allowed me to bum a ride from time to time.

If you could give one piece of advice to anyone who was considering run commuting, what would it be?

Ease into it if you are running with a backpack. Going immediately into 8-10 runs a week with a 8lb+ loaded backpack can really be tough on the lower back initially – I learned that lesson the hard way.

Anything else that you would like to include?

How fortunate we are to be able to set our own challenges – may your run commuting be full of great challenges, extreme weather and many quality miles punctuated by sweet hill climbs.

Don’t underestimate traffic. Even though we usually follow all the pedestrian rules/lights, many drivers are just distracted. I’ve been hit twice this year by folks who weren’t paying attention – fortunately, I was able to escape injury.

 

The New Run Commuters Submission Form

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Tell us a little about your run commute! (required)

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:30+00:00 August 17th, 2015|Categories: General, People|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Run Commuting Manual Now Available!

Several months ago, we were asked to help put together a run commuting manual by our good friend Silvia, founder of Brazil’s number one run commuting website, Corridiaamiga. Silvia and some fellow Brazilian runners, nutritionists, and fitness leaders decided to create a booklet to explain the logistics and idea behind run commuting to those whom were interested in learning more about it. After several months of work, the manual was complete and published just in time for Silvia to present the case for Running as a Mode of Transportation to the Congress of Urban Mobility in Sao Paulo, Brazil!

The manual was originally written in Portuguese, and then translated into English. Both versions are available below, as well as under our “Become a Run Commuter” section on the website dropdown menu.

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:30+00:00 July 14th, 2015|Categories: How To, News, BecomingARunCommuter|0 Comments

Review: Icebug Mist RB9X Shoes

A pair of shoes from a Swedish company named “Icebug” wouldn’t seem to be appropriate for running in the hot, humid summers of the American South, however, I was quite surprised – they’re pretty damned good.

Though you may not have seen anyone running in Icebugs lately, the company has been around for almost 15 years. They have only had a market presence in the United States for the past few years, however, and just recently opened a unique testing center in Shale Hill, Vermont where the public can try out the shoes at their on-site obstacle course.

I tried out a pair of their Mist RB9X shoes over the past couple of months. Here’s a summary of their performance for both running and run commuting.

Icebug Mist RB9X

Icebug Mist RB9X (US Size 10)

“We were frustrated by having to choose between slipping and saying [sic] no to outdoor activities because of the risk of slipping. The company started as a result of us wanting to be able to stay active year-round.”

– On the origin of Icebug shoes

Initial Wear and Run

The shoes fit great and are true to size. I love the off-center tongue loop and the cushiony feel of the tongue and collar. It makes for a very comfortable feeling around the ankles.

They’re slightly flexible. They initially feel quite stiff and you don’t really feel any cushioning underfoot.

The tread is amazing and makes Icebug shoes stand out from the competitiors. The crazy combination of rubber knobs, raised surfaces, little rounded buttons, and corrugations seem out of place on a road shoe, so I was a bit leery at first about how the Mists would run on streets.   

The upper is made of a tough, durable mesh. While you would expect a mesh upper to be breathable, the Mists seem to surpass that expectation. I had a fan on nearby when I first tried them on and you could feel the breeze pass through extremely well.The only shoe that I’ve worn with a similar breeziness were the Salomon Techamphibians, which – oddly enough – were the shoes I used for run commuting when I first started almost 7 years ago.

Quick Facts

5 mm Drop

9.4 oz. Weight

Rubber 9 Extreme Outsole

Minimal Cushioning (though listed as Medium)

One Color Option (Shell and Sapphire)

My test run – a 5.3-mile morning run commute through urban and suburban neighborhoods – went quite well. My initial thoughts after I finished:

  • The shoes are stiff, but feel fine on the run
  • Terrain grip is excellent
  • Feet did not get warm on hot day while running
  • Did not feel rocks or roots underfoot

To expand upon several of the points above, let’s take a closer look at the traction on the sole.

The tread pattern is grippy on flat, smooth surfaces and very functional on rough terrain. They worked extremely well in all conditions I tested. 

Extended Test Period – Road and Trail

After running over 60 miles in the shoes, I’ve found that the shoes pair best with a slightly padded sock, such as the Thorlo Experia or Trail Runner, rather than a thinner one like the Drymax Lite-Mesh sock. The stiff insole allows the foot to slide around inside a bit too much otherwise. Buying a half size smaller may solve the issue, though I prefer a looser fit in the midfoot and toe.

The shoes are solid performers in the city. You never know what kinds of conditions or terrain you will come across during a run commute, and, in my case, whatever those happened to be, the Mists handled them exceptionally well. Here are some of the surfaces and/or conditions that I encountered:

  • Wet and dry concrete
  • Wet and dry asphalt
  • Dirt trails
  • Stream crossings
  • Slightly muddy trails
  • Heavy-volume rainstorms
  • Gravel
  • Medium-sized stone paths (think railroad grades)
  • Dusty, pollen-covered, and wet steel road plates
  • Wooden footbridges

On my trail test runs, I took them through several stream crossings and was amazed at how well they both shed water and returned to their pre-submerged state. With some trail shoes, the cushioning and upper retain moisture for a long time, leaving you with wet feet and soggy, squishy, heavy steps for up to a mile-and-a-half afterwards.

These shoes would be ideal for obstacle course racing, where the terrain and surface conditions change frequently and you are constantly getting wet. Apparently, I was not the first to realize this – Icebug was just signed on as the official footwear sponsor of the 2015 Obstacle Course Racing World Championships.

Pros

  • Comfortable, airy upper
  • Durable construction
  • Rock-solid tread for any conditions
  • Drains water extremely well
  • Dries quickly
  • Great for road and trail

Cons

  • Little cushioning
  • Rubbed a little on longer runs (8+ miles)

Summary

For the run commuter, the Icebug Mists will treat you well overall. They’re a good, all-around run commuting shoe, in which one can easily switch from hopping paver stones along a sidewalk, to bombing down steep trails and plunging through streams on the detour in to your office. Best for up to mid-distance commutes (5 – 8 miles), and those accustomed to running in minimal shoes.

Icebug’s International Website

* Disclosure: Icebug provided us a pair of Mists for this review.

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:30+00:00 July 13th, 2015|Categories: Gear, General|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

In the News: Nine reasons why running to work beats the train

Here’s a nice, concise piece about run commuting that recently ran in the UK’s Telegraph. One of the best parts: 

6. You’ll avoid talking to strangers on the train

Let’s be honest: no one wants to hear about their fellow commuter’s bunion surgery while travelling on the 7.53.

 

Aside from the fact that your legs are unlikely to go on strike as often as National Rail, run commuting boasts a number of key benefits

Source: Nine reasons why running to work beats the train

By | 2015-05-31T14:32:44+00:00 May 31st, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on In the News: Nine reasons why running to work beats the train

Can You Run Faster Than a Car? Run the Beat the Commute Race and Find Out  – Be Well Philly

The other day, I got out of a cab that had been stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic for a good 10 minutes, because I figured it would take me less time to walk where I was going than to drive there — and the thought that you can get places faster by foot is the idea of the…

Source: Can You Run Faster Than a Car? Run the Beat the Commute Race and Find Out  – Be Well Philly

Thanks to Cathy B. for sending this our way!

By | 2015-05-08T10:14:33+00:00 May 8th, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Can You Run Faster Than a Car? Run the Beat the Commute Race and Find Out  – Be Well Philly

Review: Hoka One One Clifton

The Hoka One One Cliftons are a lot of shoe. When I first pulled one out of the box and turned it over in my hands, it almost felt like I was holding a football at the park, preparing to throw it. But, that look and feel is exactly what makes Hokas, well…Hokas.

Hoka One One emerged in 2010 and turned the tables on the minimal shoe craze that was raging strong with their head-turning “maximalist shoes,” designed to provide the foot with maximum protection against the ground underneath. Since they hit the market, runners wearing Hokas have consistently been performing very well at both trail and road races throughout the years. They’ve been doing especially well in the last two years in ultramarathons, worn by such notable racers as Sage Canaday, Karl Meltzer, Dave Mackey, Darcy Africa, and Jen Benna (who recently placed first female at the American River 50-miler whilewearing Cliftons!).

With all that in mind, Hokas seem like they would be a fantastic shoe for run commuters. We run consistently throughout the year over terrain that, while not usually woodsy trail, can be quite similarly irregular, jagged, rough, and variable. And, unlike a nice soft trail, our commutes are spent pounding bone-shaking pavement day after day, usually with an additional 8 – 10 pounds in our packs.

So, when Hoka One One sent me a pair of their latest model Cliftons to try out, I was pumped. Here’s how they performed for run commuting.

Hoka One One Clifton

The Hoka One One Cliftons (US Size 10)

Initial Wear and Walk

Since the drop in these shoes (5 mm) was a bit more than what I normally run in, I wanted to start off by wearing the Cliftons for a short one-mile walk.

The shoes fit snugly and were slightly tighter in the midfoot region, with more ample space in the toe box. The first few steps were surprising; it was like walking across couch cushions on my living room floor – springy, bouncy, comfortable.

The midfoot region pushed up into my arch at first, but relaxed after about a half mile.

The tread pattern is grippy on flat surfaces and very functional on rough terrain

Quick Facts

5 mm Drop

7.7 oz. Weight

24 – 29 mm Sole

Meta-Rocker Geometry

Six Color Options

$130.00 USD

The Clifton’s thick sole provides impressive protection and comfort

Things I Noticed on my Run Commute

  • When running, the shoes felt like they caught my foot as I landed, rocked it forward, and then pushed me off again. I’m not used to having such full foot movement, and it was cool to feel. 
  • Hills were the Clifton’s strong game. I felt like I had a distinct advantage, both in comfort and leverage, while running up and down hills. The Meta-Rocker geometry they tout actually works very well.
  • I felt almost nothing underfoot. It took a while to get used to, but the sole thickness provides a ridiculous amount of protection, allowing me to run over large broken rock, pushed-up sidewalk, and a litany of other rough surfaces without discomfort. 

Pros

  • Great for running up and down hills
  • I felt nothing underfoot, even while running over large broken rock
  • Extremely comfortable
  • Excellent tongue material
  • Excellent overall construction
  •  Minimized surface impact

Cons

  • May require an adjustment period if you were previously using a higher drop shoe

Summary

Overall, a great shoe with a unique design that feels like it gives the runner an advantage. A bit bulky at first, and may require a gradual build-up period, but it is worth it. The Cliftons are great on long runs and should have a long use-life (500+ miles?). Perfect for those looking for more foot protection in a shoe. Ideal for run commuters who regularly carry heavy loads.

* Disclosure: Hoka provided us a pair of Cliftons for this review.

By | 2018-02-27T15:01:15+00:00 April 19th, 2015|Categories: Gear|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Review: Sunwarrior Protein Powders

I’m really bad at recovering after a run. Really bad. My normal routine usually includes a 5.5-mile run commute home, followed by jumping in the car to go pick up a kid from school, then rehydrating with a cheap, watered-down beer while I cook dinner when I return home. 

In the 20-60 minutes after your workout, your muscles can store carbohydrates and protein as energy and help in recovery.

I know there is a brief, post-workout window in which your body is primed for receiving replacement protein and carbohydrates, but I ignore that and move on with the night, much to my bodies detriment, no doubt.

So, when Sunwarrior sent us their Starter Pack (updated in 2016 to this) filled with raw, vegan protein powders and supplements to test out, I was excited to try them and see how they made me feel after a good run.

 

Test and Evaluation

All of the products were sampled after a 5.5-mile run which ranged in duration from 42:00 – 45:00 minutes. My 6-year-old, Everett, insisted on tasting each one as well. His comments are included.

Sample #1: Chocolate Warrior Blend with Ormus Supergreens (Added to 10 oz. Light Vanilla Soymilk)

Everett - Product Tester Extraordinaire

Everett – Taste Tester Extraordinaire

This was really good! It was thick, but smooth, with a flavor not unlike a cold mug of hot chocolate. There was a slightly sweet aftertaste which remained for a brief period after consumption (which is no surprise, as the products are sweetened with the natural sweetener, Stevia.) Even with the added Supergreens, the flavor was chocolaty and delicious. 

The directions suggest adding 6-10 oz. of liquid to the powder, however, after trying it, my personal preference would be to add no less than 12 oz. to cut down the thickness a little more.

Everett’s Review: “Great!”

Sample #2: Classic Protein Vanilla with Ormus Supergreens (Added to 14 oz. Light Vanilla Soymilk)

This was pretty good. The Supergreens were peppermint flavored, and I think adding them to a vanilla powder worked very well. Even though they have long been touted as health powerhouses, powdered greens can be unpalatable for those unused to them, but together with the Classic Vanilla powder, they went nearly unnoticed in the final drink.

Aside from the “greens” part of the Supergreens powder, Sunwarrior adds even more healthy additives, too, including several species of Lactobacillus Acidopholis, and a smorgasbord of leaves, roots, and grasses.

The Classic Protein Powder added in 15g of easily-digestible protein in one serving.

Everett’s Review: “Really good, but not as good as the other one.”

Sample #3: Vanilla Warrior Blend with Activated-Sprouted Barley (Added to 12 oz. Vanilla Soymilk)

This was good, though the “greens” taste of the sprouted barley was much more noticeable in a vanilla-flavored shake than in the chocolate. The overall consistency was a bit chalky, but not bad going down. 

The Barley powder is meant to be used for sustained energy, as it is slow-burning, so in retrospect, I should have had this combination pre-run to keep me from bonking. Nevertheless, the mixture provides 20g of pea/cranberry/hemp protein (and that’s not counting the additional 10g of protein from soymilk.)

Everett’s Review: “Pretty good.”

Sample #4: Classic Protein Chocolate with Liquid Light (Added to 12 oz. of Vanilla Soymilk)

This was one of my favorites. The texture was smooth, it was flavorful, and was the least gritty of all the previous samples. It only contained 16g of brown rice protein, but the addition of the Liquid Light (fulvic acid and long list of minerals) packet added an additional healthy kick to the overall nutrition profile. 

Everett’s Review: “Great! Tastes like chocolate milk.”

Can be mixed, but best on its own

Can be mixed, but best on its own

Sample #5: Healthy Shooter

The Immune Shield liquid packet simply suggests taking one or more daily, so I just tore the top off and chugged it down. It was tart and sour, with the consistency of water.

The text on the package touts the health benefits of fulvic acid and complex silver, and their roles in enhancing the individual’s immune system. Not bad at all…

Summary

My preferred shake was the Sunwarrior Chocolate Warrior Blend with Supergreens. This is something I can see myself drinking regularly after my daily run commute and not growing tired of it. It mixes well, tastes great, goes down easy, and provides a noticeable sense of fullness for a while thereafter; so much so, that I tended to eat less dinner when consumed within an hour-and-a-half beforehand.

The Blender Bottle, with its removable whisk ball, did a fantastic job of mixing the products with ice-cold soymilk. Nothing was left on the sides or bottom, where powders tend to gather and clump.

If you live an active, plant-based life, you should give Sunwarrior’s shakes and supplements a shot for your pre- and post-workout nutrition.

Quick Facts

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:32+00:00 March 27th, 2015|Categories: General|Tags: , , , , , , |1 Comment

Giveaway! 2015 Warrior Dash – Georgia (April 11, 2015)

Do you love getting dirty? Do you like to spend your Saturday mornings running through obstacle courses? Want to participate in an an event that has raised millions of dollars for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital?

Well then, The Run Commuter has something just for you!

We’re giving away TWO ENTRIES to the April 11, 2015 WARRIOR DASH GEORGIA event, sponsored by the official race drink of the Warrior Dash Series, ROCKIN’ REFUEL!

What is the Warrior Dash?

The Warrior Dash is a 3.1-mile (5K) race over moderately-hilly terrain and through, over, and under, 21 obstacles on what’s known as the “battleground.” The Georgia event is one of 50 locations around the globe which hosts the race series, and participants revceive a beer, shirt, medal, and warrior helmet upon finishing.

If you are ready to try something different and challenge yourself, the Warrior Dash is for you. Check out the pics from last year’s race below. More can be found here

WARRIOR DASH OFFICIAL SPONSOR

ABOUT ROCKIN’ REFUEL

Made with real milk, Rockin’ Refuel is packed with the natural protein athletes of all levels need to achieve their physical goals – whether it’s rebuilding muscle after a workout or building strength to get ready for game day. Featuring the ideal amount of high quality protein, Rockin’ Refuel offers the protein milk beverage for you to maximize your performance.

WHERE TO BUY

Click here to find a location near you

EVENT DATE

April 11, 2015
– Start times vary –

LOCATION


 

VISIT WARRIOR DASH GEORGIA’S WEBSITE

Click Here

CONTEST DETAILS

The giveaway is open to everyone.

The race takes place in Northern Georgia.

The more entries you receive through the giveaway app, the better your chances are of winning.

Giveaway begins at 12:00am EST on March 27, 2015 and ends on April 4, 2015 at 12:00am EST.

If you are a winner, you must register for the Warrior Dash by midnight on April 9, 2015.

ENTER NOW FOR A CHANCE TO WIN AN ENTRY!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:32+00:00 March 27th, 2015|Categories: Giveaway|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Review: Deuter Futura 22 Backpack

All of us down here at The Run Commuter’s Atlanta, GA headquarters decided it was time to get some new packs to test out, so over the next few months, we’ll have some in-depth insight and detailed field test results from a handful of running backpacks. First up, the Deuter Futura 22.

Performance and Evaluation

Blinkie lights will fit in between the zippers on the top and bottom of the pack.

I ran approximately 50 miles with the Deuter during rainstorms, extreme cold weather, and mild-to-warm days over several weeks.

When I first put the pack on, I immediately noticed how much more comfortable it was than the Osprey Manta 20. That was entirely a result of the thick padding within both the shoulder and waist straps, as well as a small patch of cushioning that rests between your shoulder blades.

The lower portion of the frame felt like two fists gently pushing into my kidneys. It was strange, and normally something you’d experience in an external-frame hiking backpack.

The break-in period for the pack ranged from 10 – 15 miles. What happened during that time was two-fold – One, the straps loosened slightly from their stiff out-of-the-box feel; and two, the waist strap cushioning softened. These two things together allowed the pack to adjust and fit the individual shape of my body much better than it had when brand new, leading to a more comfortable run (Note: this is normal for all packs, with some variability in the length of time it takes.) The “two-fists-pushing-into-my-kidneys” feel gradually lessened, with a bit more use, changing from slightly uncomfortable to unnoticeable.

The rain cover is tucked away in the standard location at the base of the pack and stays on without using a plastic toggle spring like Osprey rain covers, which tend to drift in between your back and the pack while moving, creating some discomfort. I used the rain cover during my first test run with the Futura. It deployed and went on quickly, and kept the pack, and the items inside, secure and dry.

I experienced absolutely no hot spots or abrasion areas. None. Some days I used the pack while wearing full winter gear, with several layers between my body and the pack; some days it was just a single tech shirt. No chafing, whatsoever.

There are no attachments for lights on the back of the pack, but I found that blinking lights could be added in between the dual zippers on the top and bottom of the pack.

In addition, the hiking poles attachment (seen on the left side of the pack) works quite well for carrying a long-handled umbrella to or from work.

Overall, the Deuter Futura 22 is a great pack for run commuting and I would put it in a tie for first place with the Osprey Manta 20, followed closely by the Osprey Stratos 24.

What I Liked

Volume: Very roomy; enough space for work clothes, lunch, and a winter jacket

Strap Padding: Very thick and comfortable

Bottom Pouch with main compartment access

Raincover is effective and does not use a plastic toggle spring

What I Didn’t Like

No pouches on waist strap

Cannot access side pouches while running

No blinkie/light attachments on back of pack (I use Amphipod Vizlets in between the dual zippers for low-light conditions)

It should be noted that these certainly wouldn’t keep me from purchasing this pack.

Let’s Get Down to Details

 Volume

22 Liters

Weight

2.5 pounds

Material

60% polyester

40% nylon

Color

Papaya/Stone

Price

Buy It Now

Amazon.com

Front

The front of the Deuter Futura 22 includes a large, fold-down zippered accessories pouch at the top, and a rounded, dual-zippered compartment at the bottom. Inside the accessories compartment are several standard mesh pouches and key clips for keeping your small items organized and in-place while moving.

The front of the Futura 22 includes two compartments and four small areas of reflective material.

The accessories pouch is large and will easily hold all of your personal items, like cell phone, wallet, and keys.

Sides

Both sides of the pack feature elastic-topped pouches which are crossed over by the packs lower set of external compression straps. Each pouch is partially-covered by reflective material that wraps around to the front of the pack.

Each side includes an elastic pouch and both a lower and upper set of external compression straps.

Main Compartment

The main compartment, while very basic, is extremely roomy. It easily fits my Eagle Creek Pack-It Specter, winter jacket, lunch, and extra running gear, with space to spare. The Futura is hydration compatible, and includes a hydration sleeve and velcro attachment (shown below,) as well as a tube slot at the top of the pack.

The spacious main compartment, with hydration sleeve and attachment

Bottom Compartment

The bottom compartment, open.

The bottom compartment is not a normal feature of run commuting packs. Standard packs generally have a large main compartment and one or two smaller accessories pouches near the top.

Inside view, showing the zippered access to the bottom of the main compartment.

Back/Suspension

The Deuter Futura 22’s suspension system.

Deuter’s breathable suspension system, called AirComfort, is very similar in concept to the AirSpeed frames that Osprey manufactures. The one noticeable difference is that the Futura’s wire frame forms an “X,” whereas Osprey’s lightwire frame forms a rectangle. This gives the Futura a little more malleability at the sides, allowing it to contour to your shape a little better than the Osprey.

Rain Cover

In my opinion, a rain cover should be a feature on any pack you use for run commuting. If you get caught in a rainstorm, you only have to stop for a few seconds to unzip and cover your pack, keeping nay electronics and dress clothing dry and out of the weather. Deuter even added a reflective logo to the cover, so when it is on and covering up the pack’s standard reflective fabric areas, you still have a little extra something to keep you visible to drivers.

The Futura’s rain cover is found at the very bottom of the pack.

The rain cover on the pack.

UPDATE:

People were asking if the Futura fit a laptop or not. Short answer – it does! It sits inside a little weirdly due to the curved wire frame of the pack, but it works! See pics for more detail.

 

15-inch laptop secured inside inside the Futuras hydration sleeve.

Due to the curved nature of the pack frame, any flat rectangular object placed against it creates a space at the lower and upper ends of the pack. No worries, though…the laptop rides securely.

By | 2017-11-07T13:13:52+00:00 March 3rd, 2015|Categories: Gear|Tags: , , , , , , , |10 Comments
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