Review: Salomon Snowcross CS

Salomon Snowcross CS

Salomon Snowcross CS

Running on ice can be treacherous, and sometimes even dangerous. For many years, I have been carrying a set of Yaktrax for those days where the paths were just too icy to run comfortably. However, I never felt I had stable and solid footing while running with these on, and most of the time, I ended up running much slower than desired. Running intervals with these on was simply just out of the question.

Since running on icy and snowy surfaces north of the 49th parallel is frequent, I started looking for other options. Among them are the IceSpikes. Unfortunately, I was never able to test them since they are, at least in my area, only available through online purchase.

Last Spring, as I was resigned to keep doing my best with my Yaktrax for many more years, I stumbled on a very good deal for a pair of Salomon Snowcross CS.  I had known about these shoes for over two years, but their price tag ($200) was, at least back then, just too high for the family budget. This time though (under 100$), I did not hesitate.

 These shoes stayed in my closet until this past November, where Ottawa started having some relatively inclement weather, which left us with quite a bit of snow, lots of ice and some cold temperature, but still not enough to get the cross country skis out, for about a month.

Not expecting much, I took the Snowcross out for many spins over that month… and I don’t think I will be able to live without them ever again.

On the ice, the nine carbide spikes on each shoes offered unprecedented grip, to a point where my brain actually had problems adjusting to it  (“lots of ice. Should be slippery. Very slippery, but… not slippery. Not at all… can’t compute.”)  Honestly, it took me about four or five runs over a week to understand that these would keep me going on the ice as fast as if I was on clear roads.

Ice-covered trails are part of my everyday commute

Icy trails are part of my everyday commute

In the snow, the aggressive cleat pattern also got me going pretty fast.  The integrated gate design, borrowed from the cross country ski world, also kept the snow out while keeping me warm and cozy.

Frankly, I am now in love with these shoes.  If you have to run on icy and snowy roads on your way to work, they offer amazing grip while keeping you warm.

Since I have to keep a minimum of critical sense, the low points of these shoes are:

  • the integrated gate is water resistant, but not waterproof.  It will keep you dry through snow, but not through puddle of slushy water.
  • the white lines are not reflective.  For shoes of that price, this would be expected.

 Last, but not least; with the carbide spikes*, make sure you do not walk on wooden floors.

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*The Salomon Snowcross CS share their soles with carbide spikes with the Salomon Spikecross. The latest are basically the same shoes as the Snowcross, but without the integrated gate. Therefore, a clever alternative to the Snowcross would be a pair of Spikecross combined with a set of short gators. The company Inov-8 also has two models with integrated carbide spikes (Oroc 280 and Oroc 340), which could also be used in conjunction with a short set of gators for similar results.

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:33+00:00 January 5th, 2015|Categories: Gear|Tags: , , , , , |0 Comments

Run Commuting with Kids

We’ve got a great guest post for you today! Brendan Couvreux and his family of four run as their primary form of transportation. That’s right. Rather than drive or use public transit to get to work or run errands, they primarily run to get where they need to go (they do have a vehicle for longer road/camping trips).

Brendan and his wife Chloe, both avid climbers before having kids, made a few changes to their lives after their first child was born to continue to remain active and maintain their fitness levels. It worked so well for them that they continued to run everywhere around their hometown of Boulder, CO after having a second child. They chronicle their running, camping, and climbing adventures on their excellent blog, A Climbing Party of Four. Here is the post that Brendan shared with us:


Brendan and kids, running through Boulder, CO on a snowy day.

Brendan, running through Boulder, CO with his children in a Chariot stroller.  

I am a regular guy who appreciates the simple things in life. Along with trying to keep things simple, I’ve always had an appreciation for alternative means of transportation. Through my college years, I lived in San Francisco and learned to love biking all across the city. It was definitely the best way to get around, considering the traffic, parking hassles, money savings and of course the added benefits of some physical activity and a great MPG rating. I eventually ended up in Boulder, Colorado where biking around town was even easier than it was in San Francisco.

Soon my wife and I had our first child. We were both active individuals and spent lots of time climbing, mixed in with some occasional running, skiing and hiking. We had heard of the challenges and frustrations people run into in trying to stay active with children. We had heard that it was the small things that would start to trip people up. Things like running errands and going grocery shopping suddenly became incredible time consuming nightmares while trying to juggle the moods, naps and needs of a potentially screaming child. Add in some traffic, full parking lots, inclement weather and things can become downright stressful and dangerous. Who really wants to go “workout” after spending a day of doing that?

My wife and I wanted to try and just learn as we went and try to adopt as few of these assumptions as possible. We invested into an expensive, high-end stroller we could use as a bike trailer and running stroller. We also found one where our little kiddo could be fully enclosed and bundled in times of inclement weather. 

MilkChariotSoon after our first child was born, we began bringing him around town in the bike stroller a lot, and running with him in it on occasion as well. As time went on, we began running more and more. By the time our second child was born, we had learned and adapted to use running as our primary form of transportation.

Neither my wife nor I ever considered ourselves “runners.” We would enjoy occasional trail runs but nothing too crazy. As our life with children evolved, we began to realize the potential “exercise” and movement that was guaranteed by our daily life chores, simply by running everywhere, instead of using the car, or even the bike. Running, for us, would prove to be more versatile than biking. No matter the weather or the terrain, we could always run with the stroller and the kids. The bike was more questionable in times of snow and ice. Riding on the road in the dark never felt very safe either. Running proved to be much easier, and quicker, to tend to the children if one was unhappy, needed a pacifier, snack water bottle, or whatever. We could just stop and take care of them. There was no waiting for a red light or undoing seat belts to reach the back seat. Parking was obviously a non-issue. Time of day and nap schedule was hardly limiting in that one or both kids could nap in the stroller and we could go about our errands (in and out of stores) without having to wake them up and take them in and out of their car seat.

SleepingChariot

The miles would slowly add up through the days, through the weeks, and through the months. The kids became used to taking the stroller to go everywhere. Our bodies began to adapt to the running lifestyle. Running around town became baseline for us. We could always put one foot in front of the other while pushing the stroller. We adapted to all the seasonal conditions, and would run no matter if it was rain, shine, snow or wind. The kids could see this too, and started to become inspired on their own to mimic mom and dad.

When we marvel at people such as the Tarahumara and their incredible ability to run for long distances, and for it to be seemingly so consistent across so many generations; I wonder if this is part of what we are missing as a civilization. Something so simple, and so basic. Running is a wonderful form of transportation on its own, and it’s amazing what starts to happen when we use it as such. Is it about being committed to fitness, to the environment, or just going back to basics? Maybe it’s a little bit of it all.

Running

 
By | 2016-10-22T20:26:36+00:00 June 18th, 2014|Categories: General|Tags: , , , , , |3 Comments

Rubbed the Wrong Way: Warm Weather Chafing

As the weather warms, the coverage we look for in running clothes drops off dramatically. It seems so freeing to run with as little on as possible. I will be faster! I’m like a wild animal! It’s not until I get home and survey the damage from skin rubbing on skin or cloth that I realize it wasn’t such a good idea after all.

Chafing! Miles and miles of it. Burning, stinging, oozing, and bleeding in some very sensitive regions of my body. Add a run commuter backpack to the mix and there is bound to be chafing in areas of which you’d never thought.

We put together a list of problem areas and anti-chafing solutions, as well as a some additional fixes you can make, to keep your run commute as smooth and irritation-free as possible.

Running Form

Running with a backpack requires some adjustment. Even if you haven’t paid much attention to your form before, you will immediately recognize if adjustments to your stride or posture need to be made. Runner’s World recently reposted one of the best articles on form that I have ever read. It was written in 2005, and there have certainly been lots of others since, but not many with advice that you can so easily apply on your own.

Your pack, with sternum and waist straps buckled and cinched, will normally pull your shoulders back and straighten your posture while you run. Run with strides too far apart under this setup however, and no matter how well your pack fits, it will rub somewhere. Practice running with good form and you will not only reduce the likelihood of backpack chafe, you’ll also find yourself to be a more effective runner without the pack.

Chafing Problem Areas

Under arms: Device cases and backpack straps are the worst offenders here. To borrow from a recent very popular animated film in which the main character suffers from complex icy architecture shooting from her fingers unsolicited, “Conceal it. Don’t feel it.” A layer of clothing between you and the offending strap and a good bit of lube is the only way to prevent this if running with these items is desired or required. For these hot summer months, try an ultra-lightweight moisture wicking shirt. Take your pack and device case with you to the store to try on new running clothes. That way you can see if they fit comfortably together and ensure that your trouble spots are covered.

Sports bra chafe

Sports bra chafe

Shoulders, Lower Back and Stomach: These are all from backpack straps. We here at TRC are of at least two different schools of thought on this one. Josh likes his straps tight; I like mine kinda loose. Again, look at your form and your pack and make adjustments on the fly. If your pack is rubbing a hole in your back, it is moving around. If it is moving around, either you are bouncing or wasting tons of energy with side-to-side motion, or your pack it too loose, or possibly both.

Here is Josh’s advice to a new run commuter suffering from backpack-related chafing:

‘First of all, cinch everything down like crazy. In order, tighten your waist strap, then shoulder straps, then sternum strap… All of these can be adjusted on the run as well. Usually, I readjust everything once I’ve been running for a few minutes.

Wear polyester-based shirts; either 100% poly, or at a minimum, a 50/50 poly/cotton blend. After you start sweating, these types of shirts tend to stick to your skin better than cotton, and provide a slippery, non-irritating surface for your pack to slide over if it is loose.’

Nipples: Chafed nipples are mostly commonly a problem for men, but women can get them too from wearing an ill-fitting or poorly supporting bra, but that may need to be addressed in a later post. The cause is the same though: bouncing. Noticing a theme here? Some guys stick Band-Aids over their nips, others use Vaseline or an anti-chafe product, such as Red11Sport. And then, some just deal with it until their nipples become less sensitive. One or two good long, sweaty runs will result in painfully raw, possibly bleeding, nipples. Thankfully they heal quickly and will be tougher and less likely to chafe again. As long you keep running regularly, they will stay that way. As a mother who has breastfed two children, I have to say that this last option is probably the easiest in the long run if you can handle it.

Inner thighs: I am a normal-sized human being, and my thighs touch. They did when I was a little girl, and they will until the day I die, or, God-forbid, only have one leg. This is arguably the most common spot for chafing on a woman. Do an internet search on chafing (like I did for this post) and most of what comes up are blog posts from women whose thighs touch and means by which they’ve tried to prevent it. You must do one or both of two things: cover them or lube them.

Thigh chafe. That shower is gonna hurt...

Thigh chafe. That shower is gonna hurt…

“I feel like such a sexy beast standing at the trailhead lubing up my thighs before a run,” said no one ever. But no one ever managed a sexy walk while suffering from inner thigh chafe either. Compression-style gear is tight-fitting, like bike shorts without the chamois, and acts like a second skin, so all the friction will be on it and not your sensitive bits. However if heading out of doors wearing what feels

[looks] like sausage casing doesn’t appeal to you, try a loose, lightweight layer on top. You may also notice that shortening your stride length helps keep your shorts down on/between your legs. I don’t know who told running clothes manufactures that everyone likes (and can wear) short shorts for running. Some companies are getting better about making slightly longer lengths, but I for one do not want very short or very tight. Rubbing a friction reducing product on the areas that touch will not only help keep your thigh skin from rubbing off, but also your shorts from riding up, and you from walking like a monkey for a couple of days.

Anti-Chafe Solutions

Try out different kinds of anti-friction products. You can often buy small/trial sizes of different kinds to help you find one you like. When you do find one that works, buy several so you’re never stuck without it.

A few of our lubricants on display. L to R - Aquaphor (generic, store-brand), Body Glide, Vaseline.

A few of our lubricants on display. L to R – Aquaphor (generic, store-brand), Body Glide, Vaseline.

Aquaphor and Vaseline are my favorite products because they have so many uses. They are also affordable and easy to find. Before I head out on a run, I smear it on my lips, under the band of my sports bra and shorts, and on my thighs. If, despite all my preventative measures, I still get a raw spot, Aquaphor is very soothing as well.

Here are some products we like, and where to find them:

On-the-Run Chafing Emergencies

I may scandalize or otherwise shock you here, but picture this: you’re headed home from work. It’s been a fine day, relatively normal, but you are eagerly anticipating leaving on vacation on Friday. It is only Tuesday, but you have much on your mind- saltwater fishing, that chef that’s going to come cook an amazing dinner for y’all, which books are you going to read, how many pairs of running shoes can bring without your partner mocking you…Anyway, the run home will be great for thinking about those things.

It’s pretty hot, and you are getting ridiculously sweaty, because in this story you are me and I sweat. A lot. Suddenly, a twinge of something, a tiny prick of stinging pain rouses you from your pleasant thoughts. You realize you forgot to put on your anti-chafing stuff! DAMMMMMITTTT! Pleasant thoughts instantly change to – cute new bathing suit is ruined, ocean water is going to burn like acid, how am I going to look amazing wearing shorts and walking like someone who is just getting used to standing upright? If you can get over how gross this idea is, you still can. Raise your hand up to your mouth and spit a big glob of saliva on it, cough something up if you have to. Then rub it on the spot that’s starting to chafe (in this story, your thighs, but I’ve used it under my arms, my bra band, and my pack shoulder straps too – don’t judge), and every time it dries out, do it again until you get home. Disgusting? Yes, absolutely, but it’s better than the alternative in my book.

So, there it is. I hope these tips and ideas will get you through a long, hot summer of run commuting without losing too much skin. I’d love to hear how you manage chafing and your high friction areas too.

Running Gear Fit to Face a Canadian Winter

We’re excited to introduce a new contributor to the The Run Commuter! Nick Pedneault joins us from Ottawa, Canada and will be writing about running in harsh winter conditions up north, as well as sharing tips, advice, and gear reviews from which all run commuters, in any climate, can benefit. Welcome to TRC, Nick!   

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The Run Commuter, Cold Weather Running, Boston Marathon, Canadian Runners, Nick Pedneault, Polar Ninja

Nick after a typical Canadian winter run

My name is Nicolas Pedneault, and I am a run commuter from the Ottawa area, Canada. I have been run commuting for 6 years now, and I am planning on doing so for as long as I can. Run commuting for me was the result of many factors: I wanted to keep doing sports like I used to before I was married and had kids, but without neglecting family life; I did not have a parking spot at work; and I wanted a solution to get to work which was valid year round. One year, I cycled to work in the winter; in May, my bike was as good as junk because of the salt they use to de-ice roads. Public transit was a solution, but there is not much sports involved in taking the bus. To make matters worse, OC Transpo – the Ottawa public transport company – went on a 2-month long strike in 2009. That was the last straw for me: I started running to get to and from work.

My total daily commute is between 16 and 24 kilometres (10-15 miles), every day of the week. Running in Ottawa year-round means facing temperatures as high as 36ºC (97ºF) and as low as -35ºC (-31ºF). Consequently, it requires a wide variety of gear to face the elements.

Running year-round in Ottawa means running through some pretty harsh weather – snowstorms, freezing rain, blistering cold, tornados, etc. However, in the present post, I will stick to the blistering cold, describing the gear I use to run at temperatures between -30 ºC and -35ºC (-22 ºF and -31ºF). I have no preferences in terms of brands; consequently, the pictures included in this post and the brands are mentioned for general information purposes only. However, the brands mentioned are the ones I use.

Feet

To prevent my feet from freezing, I combine a pair of thin liner socks (Wigwam Ultimate Liner Pro) with a pair of heavier merino wool socks (Great Canadian sox company super-wool hiker GX socks). Although I wear 2 pairs of socks, it all fits nicely in my normal running shoes. For winter, I use standard trail runners (either Saucony Peregrine or Brooks Cascadia). I know speciality shoes are now available for cold running (for example, Salomon SnoCross CS), but I have yet to venture on that road since outside winter, these are of no use.

Legs

In that order, I wear a pair of thermal tights (MEC Mercury tights), a pair of running shorts on top of the tights and a pair of very generic wind pants (MEC Flux pants). I experimented once during a winter marathon (Ottawa Winterman, February 2013, -29ºC / -20ºF) without the shorts between the 2 layers; I ended up having to stick my mitts in my pants to warm up my manhood. Suffice to say that I highly recommend wearing shorts over the tights in winter. In my backpack, I also carry an extra pair of wind pants which are a size larger than the first one; if it gets really windy or suddenly colder than expected, I can throw them on over everything else.

Outdoor Research Enchainment Jacket

Outdoor Research Enchainment Jacket

Top

As always, I make sure to use many layers. My base layer is a 150-weight merino wool long sleeve shirt. My second layer is a 150-weight merino wool t-shirt. Over time, I found this combination of merino wool garment to be the best in terms of weight and sweat absorption. My third layer is either an old long sleeve polar fleece shirt or a Polartec power dry hoody with thumb holes (MEC T3 hoodie). The principle behind this combination of layers is pretty simple: the natural fibre near my skin is less susceptible to develop bad odours than the synthetic fibres. My final layer is a soft shell jacket with a hood (Patagonia Ascensionist or Outdoor Research Enchainment.) In cold weather, I prefer soft shells to hard shells because they are much better at letting perspiration out.

Hands

Mitts. No gloves. Just mitts. Again, I use a small pair of mitt (hand knitted by my wife’s aunt) and a bigger one on top of it (MEC overlord mitts.)

Watch

One day, it was so cold, my watch display totally froze. To avoid that, I now wear it on top of my jacket at the wrist, and I throw the bottom portion of my mitt over the watch. If you are doing intervals, it is a bit annoying to have to push your mitt up to press the buttons, but it is far less annoying than a frozen watch.

Sonic Outdoor Research Balaclava

Sonic Outdoor Research Balaclava

Head

The next piece of kit is by far the most important one for me, and this time, the brand is important. My Sonic Outdoor Research Balaclava allows me to stay warm while being able to breathe properly although the air is very cold. Many years ago, I was running with a small scarf over my mouth. Over time, it would get wet and I would eventually auto-waterboard myself from time to time. This was awful, and I looked for a balaclava that would allow me to breathe while keeping me warm. The Sonic has a special screen in front of the mouth that never freezes. It is also far away enough from my mouth to create a warm up chamber just in front of it. Because of that, I end up breathing air which is a few degrees warmer than the ambient one. Since I tend to suffer from performance induced asthma in the winter, these few degrees mean the difference between coughing all day or not at all. Over it, I will normally use a Buff around my neck, and another one over my head. For good measure, I also carry a third safety Buff in my backpack, just in case.

Backpack

I currently use a Deuter Race X backpack. It is a bit small (12 litres or 730 cubic inches), but for a bag that cost me CAD$54, I think it is near perfect. I always carry a safety jacket in it (MEC Uplink jacket with hood), which I can throw on top of everything if get too cold or if I suddenly have to stop running. As mentioned above, I also carry in it an oversized pair of wind pants, an extra Buff, my lunch and some clothes. A point worth mentioning: in winter, the simple fact of having a bag on your back will keep you warmer as it offers an additional layer of insulation.

That’s it! You’re ready to run in the midst of the Canadian winter or the polar vertex. Now, I must be honest: running in these temperatures is never that great, but I have found that these somewhat miserable runs made all summer runs great no matter what afterwards.

The Run Commuter, Cold Weather Running, Boston Marathon, Canadian Runners, Nick Pedneault

Finishing the 2014 Boston Marathon

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:38+00:00 April 30th, 2014|Categories: Gear, General|Tags: , , , , , , , |6 Comments

KA-BLOOM!

The northern United States continues to recoil from the torrid, brutal union of Old Man Winter and Mother Nature, their frisky freaking casing the upper states in ice and heaps of snow, even as we in Georgia see the daily-greening buds on trees and blooms beneath them, notice the birds are singing and the bees are trying to have sex with them (as is my understanding of the subject).
KA-BLOOM! - 01Every calendar box crossed brings more color and verdant riot streetside, a thrill for our morning run commutes: to see it change incrementally; to anticipate the full-blown riot of color and chaos of which we are on the cusp and another handful of warm days will produce! It is, for us, nigh; for the north: nein.
KA-BLOOM! - 02So I present for your enjoyment a sampling of our calmer climate, now springing forward, not to tease but to remind you it is for you soon soon soon, and when it is: splendidly so! If part of run commuting is experiencing the change and world about you, let this serve as reminder that before long you, too, will doff tights and long johns, shed those parkas and softshells, and run through green fields, your bold and bare feet impervious to grass’ blades.
KA-BLOOM! - 03If you do feel this is a tease, recall that Atlanta has scant weeks in which to revel in this weather, before hardwoods blow their wad upon the city and their pollen blankets all surfaces in a bilious yellow inch, smothering us in their effluvia. The rains will come and bring relief to asthmatics and runners’ labored breathing, but will mix the urban forest’s particulate ejaculate into a monochromatically foul paste.
KA-BLOOM! - 04Too, our spring is composed of equal parts tank tops and tornadoes, leisurely bike rides and torrential rains. Then Helios will turn his horrid gaze upon us, our temples and necks and armpits sweat-darkened for the next half-year; the dew point absurdly high, and nowhere for that sweat to go but down down down.
KA-BLOOM! - 05Hello, Vancouver! What’s up, New York! Hei, Finland! We are all ready for such growth and renewal, to bust out split-shorts and grill hot dogs, asparagus, and kebabs, to chase fireflies and wake to our window screens’ inability to filter baby birds’ chirps from the morning.

So whether your weather is already fair or, for not much longer, frosty, if this hit you as a tease or its intent as fueling anticipation, if you are in spring or the tail end of winter, we can all find common ground in knowing, unlike this autumnal stalwart, it is far too early for, or time to give up the ghost on, fall.
KA-BLOOM! - 06

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:42+00:00 March 13th, 2014|Categories: General|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

HLN feature on The Run Commuter

HLN ran a feature on Josh and his run commute! Josh talks about how he, and we, got started, what it’s all about, why, and how. He sounded professional and informed, and looked handsome and rugged, and made us all-around proud.

If your colleagues and dear ones ask you to summarize run commuting, direct them there — then nudge them toward trying it for themselves.

BONUS: we are still on the HLN Top 10, but this morning ranked second, sandwiched between murder.

187

Murder, Run Commuter, Murder is the new Duck, Duck, Goose.

By | 2016-12-24T10:28:23+00:00 February 19th, 2014|Categories: News|Tags: , , , |2 Comments

How I spent my snow-mer vacation

Mornings were a frenzy of sifting, mixing, baking and boxing goods; I filled the afternoons by running them to friends at the city’s four corners, where they’d cozied up or hunkered down at their homes; I thrived in the iciest, nastiest parts of the storm, without oops or incident, yet when it seemed spring sprung forth, the waxing sun clearing lawns and slopes and grass, and the temperatures rose, freeing sidewalks from the freeze, loosing ice from limbs, and flushing silt-clogged roads with melt, I nearly lost my life: this is a tale of how I spent my two-day snow-mer vacation. (more…)

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:42+00:00 February 14th, 2014|Categories: General|Tags: , , , , , , |0 Comments

How to RAIN Commute

“What do you do when it rains?”
This is among the inner circle of Common Comments I receive, reigning with How Far Do You Run; Do You Shower; That’s So Impressive; and I Could Never Do That. If I might answer them in reverse order: you can do far more than you think; when you realize what you can do, that will be impressive; no shower, but I’m a clean-up ace; five miles; and, to answer the first, at the risk of sounding flip:

I get wet.

To be fair, run commuters will ask of themselves something similar: what do I do when it rains? How do I keep my gear dry, and keep from becoming an absolutely sodden mess? Let’s talk rain wear, dry bags, planning for your rainy run and soggy jogging, and how puddles and downpours can quench your thirst for adventure and joy.
(more…)

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:43+00:00 February 11th, 2014|Categories: How To|Tags: , , , |3 Comments

The New Run Commuters – December 2013

Many of our non-run commuting readers often wonder what kind of person decides to try running to work, and are even more curious about those runners that continue to do so year after year. In our first installment of The New Run Commuters, we take a look at two runners – Ernie and Jeffrey – that are separated by almost 800 miles and experiencing dramatically different winters, but bound together by their determination to try out run commuting.


 Runner Basics

the run commuter, run commuting, running to work, winter running, winter commute, cold weather running, grand rapids runner, running in grand rapids, grand rapids commute, commuting in michigan

Geared up and ready to go

  • Name: Ernie S.
  • Age: 33
  • City/State: Grand Rapids, MI
  • Profession/Employer: Environmental Engineer for State of Michigan Department of Environmental Quality.
  • Number of years running: 10, but more seriously the last 12 months.
  • # of races you participate in a year: 2 in the last 12 months.
  • Do you prefer road or trail? I much, much prefer a wooded trail for the dynamic workout and scenery. However, trail running is a luxury I can’t often afford time-wise. I typically run on the city sidewalks, or nearby asphalt trail systems.  

Run Commuting Gear

  • Backpack: While not on the TRC Backpack roundup, I picked up a brand new Camelbak Cloud Walker on craigslist (cant pass up a good deal). I removed the hydration pack for commuting. I consulted the TRC roundup to see what features to look for. I do sometimes regret not getting a pack with a waist strap – however if I pack light and run smooooooth it’s not too bothersome.
  • Shoes: I’m hoping to transition gradually to zero drop footwear. I train sporadically with Merrell Trail Gloves, but log most commuting miles with the Innov-8 Road-X 255, which I love.
  • Clothing: Still finding my preferences. I believe in…layers! Base layers, specifically.
  • Outerwear: Zorrel Cortina jacket.
  • Headgear: I’ve gone full facemask. Sugoi Face Mask
  • Lights: Princeton Tec Byte headlamp.
  • Hydration: I’ll use the Camelbak insert when necessary (10 miles+ training runs).

On Run Commuting

Why did you decide to start run commuting?
 
It is my excuse to stay motivated and running through the winter and with a newborn on the way in January. It also makes sense for time management (kill two birds) and also from a monetary perspective (no parking passes, no gas or bus fares).
 
How often do you run commute?
the run commuter, run commuting, running to work, winter running, winter commute, cold weather running, grand rapids runner, running in grand rapids, grand rapids commute, commuting in michigan

Early morning in downtown Grand Rapids, MI.

 
Daily, with the intention of twice a day (there/back).
 
How far is your commute?
 
4 miles.
 
Do you pack or buy a lunch?
 
Pack. I typically keep week-long supplies of nut/fruit mix, couscous, oatmeal, coffee, and supplement on a daily basis.
 
What do you like most about run commuting?
 
Strange looks in the freezing pre-dawn hours in downtown GR. Being free of a vehicle.
 
Do you know of anyone else in your area that runs to work?
 
Not yet.
 
When not run commuting, how do you get to work?
 
Drive, bike, or bus. Preferably the latter. Oh, and my wife picks me up sometimes (thanks, honey).
 
the run commuter, run commuting, running to work, winter running, winter commute, cold weather running, grand rapids runner, running in grand rapids, grand rapids commute, commuting in michigan

Calder Plaza cooldown

 
  If you could give one piece of advice to anyone who was considering run commuting, what would it be?
 
  I took TRC advice and spent a week or three doing my regular (bike) commute but thinking about the logistics of doing it via run. It really helped ease the transition and   now I simply enjoy the feeling of using my feet to get to work!
 
 
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Runner Basicsthe run commuter, run commuting, running to work, winter running, winter commute, cold weather running, atlanta runner, running in atlanta georgia, atlanta commute, commuting in georgia, bike commuting, atlanta cyclist, Jeffrey Wisard

  • Name: Jeffrey Wisard
  • Age: 29
  • City/State: Atlanta, GA
  • Profession/Employer: Lead Development and Digital Marketing, Kwalu
  • Number of years running: 3
  • # of races you participate in a year: 2-3
  • Do you prefer road or trail? Road; if it’s a road race, then I can usually bike there.

Run Commuting Gear

  • Backpack: I currently carry everything. Looking to change that soon.
  • Shoes: New Balance Minimus
  • Clothing: Just a regular wicking polyester shirt/socks and running shorts…nothing fancy.
  • Outerwear: None
  • Headgear: Peal Izumi Red Beanie (when it’s cold)
  • Lights: I use my bike light, which is the NiteRider Lumina 350 Light
  • Hydration: None

On Run Commuting

Why did you decide to start run commuting?

My good friend Kyle told me about it and got me hooked on the idea. I love functional fitness – getting your exercise in going from point A to point B. 

How often do you run commute?

1 to 2 times/month. I usually bike, otherwise.

How far is your commute?

3 miles to the train, and then 1 mile to work.

Do you pack or buy a lunch?

I usually run home after work, so I bring all my gear/lunch with me in the morning. 

What do you like most about run commuting?

The freedom. Run commuting in no way limits me. I can take stops, detours, and find adventures along my run home. It’s fantastic. 

Do you know of anyone else in your area that runs to work?

Kyle, Hall, Josh.

When not run commuting, how do you get to work?

Bike, bus, train or car… in that order.

If you could give one piece of advice to anyone who was considering run commuting, what would it be?

Make sure you bring a light. Staying well-illuminated is key to not getting into trouble with car commuters. Also, be minimal. Only carry what you need, e.g., a key instead of the whole keychain, your credit card and ID instead of your whole wallet. 

More about Jeffrey:

Jeffrey Wisard loves making “big ideas” a reality and then building community around that reality. His current big idea: The Atlanta Cycling Festival (www.AtlantaCyclingFestival.com). He also has a penchant for very hoppy IPAs, strong coffee and beautiful women (I.e. His amazing girlfriend). Learn more about him at: www.linkedin.com/in/jwisard/


If you are a new run commuter and want the running world to hear your story, let us know! Send us an email to info@theruncommuter.com and we’ll go from there.
By | 2016-10-22T20:26:43+00:00 December 17th, 2013|Categories: General, News, People|Tags: , , , , , |2 Comments

New Features on TRC

It’s been a busy (and ridiculously hot) summer this year, and while we’ve been a bit short on reviews, tips, and stories about run commuting lately, we want to show you a couple of new features we’ve added to the site in case you missed them. Stay tuned for upcoming posts on the Spartan Race, a writeup on the newest version of a running pack designed by an Atlanta college student, and food transportation options.

Running Backpack Roundup

In the market for a new running backpack, but not sure which one is right for you? The Running Backpack Roundup will help you find your perfect pack!

The Roundup includes all the features in a pack that are important for run commuters: waist and sternum straps, volume, compression, rain cover, and more. We will continue to add packs to the list as we come across them and review them when we can. In the future, we’ll roll out a user-based rating system, so you’ll be able sort the table and find out which packs are user favorites and which ones to avoid.

Updated Featured Image

  

Twitter Hashtag Stream

Look to the sidebar on the right of your screen and you’ll see a new Twitter stream. Add the hashtag #runcommute to your run commuting tweets and join many others around the world talking about running to work and all the adventures that come from choosing to avoid a lifestyle of traffic jams on the roadway.

 RunCommute Hashtag Stream Snapshot

Become a Run Commuter

While the content of this topic isn’t new, the way it is accessed on the website has changed to make it simpler for newcomers to quickly and easily access the core posts on run commuting. 

Become a run commuter

That’s all we have for now. Let us know if there are any other features, stories, or additions you’d like to see on The Run Commuter! Email us at info@theruncommuter.com.

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:44+00:00 July 24th, 2013|Categories: General, News|Tags: , , , |0 Comments
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