The New Run Commuters – March 2017

Runner’s World magazine (Oct 2016) recently gave Seattle the silver medal for number 2 best running city in America (behind San Fran). Aaron Mercer, our runcommuter for this month, is a Seattle resident who uses his runcommuting to make the most of what the city has to offer. He braves the state’s rainy, wet conditions to runcommute almost every day. Aaron is helping his work colleagues stay healthy, too.

A scientist at Novo Nordisk, Aaron is also the Wellness Committee chair and promotes running to other employees. Aaron says he enjoys exploring his city on his runcommutes. He manages to incorporate cafe-testing into these runs as well, taking advantage of Seattle’s abundance of coffee joints. An excellent idea for all runcommuters: the combination of running and coffee is a classic, and what better way to start (or end) the day…especially when it’s raining!

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Runner Basics

  • Name: Aaron Mercer

  • Age: 33

  • City/State: Seattle, WA

  • Profession/Employer: Research Scientist, Novo Nordisk

  • Number of years running: 17

  • Number of races you participate in a year: 4

  • Do you prefer road or trail? Trail, but I have learned to love the road again with all of my run commuting.

 

Run Commuting Gear

  • Backpack: Formerly an Osprey Manta AG 28, but I recently made the switch to the IAMRUNBOX Pro.

  • Shoes: Anything around 7 – 8 oz in weight from Brooks or Saucony. Their shoes fit my narrow feet better than most companies’.

  • Clothing: A mix of tech shirts and shorts, as well as race shirts. I never match, because run commuting is about form over fashion!

  • Outerwear: I have a few running jackets from Brooks, but I typically layer a short sleeve and long sleeve tech shirt because winters are pretty mild in the Pacific Northwest.

  • Headgear: I typically don’t wear a hat but I will wear sunglasses in the warm/sunny months.

  • Lights: Black Diamond Sprinter. It has good lumens for the dark and drizzly evening commutes in Seattle.

  • Hydration: I’ll hold a water bottle if I bring anything at all. I tend to only bring extra hydration for runs longer than 10 miles (16km), or when the temperatures get too warm outside (above 75F).

 

Aaron Mercer

Aaron’s runcommuting route.

Beer Run!! Aaron and his friend Pete ran 10 miles between 5 breweries. Did they follow it with a coffee run?

Aaron’s runcommute pack, in his home’s appropriately white, scandi interior. 

On Run Commuting

Why did you decide to start run commuting?

Evening traffic in Seattle can be atrociously slow, and my run commute many days is as fast or faster than most forms of transport. My office is next to Amazon’s ever-expanding campus in Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood, so traffic is almost always a grind. Runcommuting also gives me a chance to get in miles without cutting into my family time outside of work.

How often do you run commute?

2-4 days per week after work, but even on my “non-running” days I add in 2 miles of running between the most efficient bus lines to get home [editor’s note: we consider any combo of running+vehicular transport to be runcommuting! So, Aaron runcommutes more than he admits ;-)]

How far is your commute?

10.5 miles (16km) for the full run, and around 2 miles if I mix in bus commuting.

Do you pack or buy a lunch?

Either, depending on what leftovers I have at home, and how much volume I have available in my backpack. My go-to spot for eating out is a Vietnamese food truck called Xplosive that seems to live on the Amazon campus — their vermicelli bowl is my favorite way to get veggies/carbs/protein when I’m in a hurry. I’m also fortunate that my job provides catered lunch twice a week.

What do you like most about run commuting?

1. I enjoy the efficient use of my time, since I get my commute and exercise finished in one activity.

2. Runcommuting keeps me disciplined with my eating and sleep habits to keep up with the demands of 20-40 miles of running per week.

3. It gives me a chance to explore the city. Seattle has a lot of history and interesting neighborhoods, so runcommuting gives me a great opportunity to scout the area. It’s also a good excuse to try one of the dozens of independent coffee shops here.

What are the weather conditions like for your runcommute?

Temperatures are always fairly mild in Seattle, but there are many days with rain and slick pavement. True to the stereotypes it is cool, wet, and cloudy for most of the year. It’s good running weather even if footing can get a bit tricky.

Do you know of anyone else in your area that runs to work? 

No, but I do see other people running with backpacks in the city. I would assume that they are runcommuting as well. There are many, many people in my office and in Seattle who bike commute, however.

When not run commuting, how do you get to work?

If I’m not running, I will either car pool, or mix in 2 miles of running to get to-and-from express bus lines. Once Seattle finishes expanding its light rail network, I will be two blocks from one of the stations.

If you could give one piece of advice to anyone who was considering run commuting, what would it be?

Invest in decent gear, and monitor your shoes for wear and tear. It’s hard to keep up with runcommuting multiple days per week with busted gear or a busted body.

Anything else that you would like to include?

My PR for a slightly longer run commute (11.46 miles) was set in October with a time of 1:18:32 (6:52/mile pace). I strive to beat that pace every time I run home!

I chair the Wellness Committee for Novo Nordisk in Seattle. My role is to oversee the budget for sports and events, as well as organizing our office’s participation in the annual JDRF Beat the Bridge Race. I encourage all Seattleites to run the race, and to join Team Novo Nordisk if they would like some camaraderie!

Even runcommuters need a holiday…Aaron in Tucson.

Are you interested in being featured on The New Run Commuters? If so, fill out the form below and we’ll send you more details.

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Run Commuting Story Roundup – February 17, 2017

Here’s a quick roundup of interesting run commuting stories I found recently. I’ll try and do a similar post monthly if enough content can be found.

If you have written a post about run commuting on your blog, or have read a news article or post about run commuting that you want us to know about, send us an email and it may show up in a future Run Commuting Story Roundup.

 


 

Stories from the run commute: “I bring snowshoes on my Montreal route”

How 7 Busy Washingtonians Find Time to Train for Marathons

Cost Analysis of Run Commuting – Do I Save Money Jan 2-6

I Guess I’m Gonna Have To Run Commute Today

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The New Run Commuters – January 2017

Our first runcommuter profile for 2017 is Bon Crowder, who also heralds another first for TRC, as she is the only runcommuter featured on this site to hail from Texas. Bon is a teacher who runs to work every day of the week. Through her That’sMath startup company Bon is educating the youth. But she is also an example to her own children in her active lifestyle. Bon shows that it is possible to be a mom, a businesswoman, an educator and also maintain a daily fitness routine — by runcommuting. Keep up the brilliant work in 2017, Bon, and we look forward to seeing your giant chicken impression on Youtube sometime soon….!

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Runner Basics

  • Name: Bon Crowder

  • Age: 45

  • City/State: Houston, Texas

  • Profession/Employer: Educator & Founder, That’s Math LLC

  • Number of years running: 11

  • Number of races you participate in a year: 2 or 3

  • Do you prefer road or trail? Road – although trail is fun, when you’re in Houston it’s kinda dangerous to get too far off the beaten path. 

 

Bon Crowder

Run Commuting Gear

  • Backpack: Pink Osprey Tempest 20 (with the backpack “raincoat” thing for those not-so-dry days)

  • Shoes: Brooks Ghost

  • Clothing: Cheap spandex shorts and Duluth Trading Company No-Yank Tank

  • Outerwear: Nike warm stuff (that fuzzy-inside stuff that Nike makes)

  • Headgear: Cap most of the time, but when it’s cold I wear something over my ears 

  • Lights: Headlamp – some cheap kind but it seems to keep going, so I’m running with it #pardonthepun

  • Hydration: Water with lemon juice in a small Osprey reservoir

Runcommute arrival at the halls of learning!

Bon loves running in the rain.

When it gets cold in Texas…..

Bon running on her birthday….to the donut store!

On Run Commuting

Why did you decide to start run commuting?

I just couldn’t find time to run. It made me nuts. So I thought, “Well, dog-gone-it, I’ll just run TO WORK!”

Since the school I was teaching at was only 2.3 miles away, it seemed ideal!

How often do you run commute?

I try to run commute everyday. I don’t buy the parking pass for the garage, so if I don’t run, I’m stuck paying parking.

That’s less of a motivator for me and more of the ideal excuse when others want me to drive and I want to run!

How far is your commute?

Well, theoretically, it’s 17 miles, but I take the bus some of the way. On a good day, I get in about 2.8 miles before the bus and then about 0.9 miles after the bus.

Do you pack or buy a lunch?

I pack a lunch. It’s always challenging figuring out the volumes of food and clothing I can carry. If I need a blazer and fancy shoes that aren’t at the office, then it’s likely my lunch is a protein bar.

On casual Friday I can go with a giant salad!

What do you like most about run commuting?

I look cool. Okay, “look” may not be the word. But you definitely gain points with people when you tell them you run to work.

For different people, it’s different reasons. Some people like that I’m not driving so there’re lower car emissions. Some are impressed with my healthier lifestyle. And then some just look at me and think, “She’s out of her mind!”

Oh, and there’re the long races. I ran a half marathon once with no official training. Turns out 10-15 pounds + 2 x day runs in ALL weather really gets you ready for just about anything!

I’m also running the Houston Marathon this weekend. My first!

Do you know of anyone else in your area that runs to work? 

Sadly, no.

When not run commuting, how do you get to work?

I’m in Texas, so I have a car. My SUV or pickup truck gets me anywhere my feet can’t get me.

If you could give one piece of advice to anyone who was considering run commuting, what would it be?

Make a list. Laminate it. And check it off every morning. You DO NOT want to get half way to work and think, “Oh, crap, I forgot….”

Anything else that you would like to include?

I’m a mom, wife, math teacher, and founder of a startup. I also blog at MathFour.com and tweet at @MathFour.

And, I can do an amazing impression of a giant chicken…

Are you interested in being featured on The New Run Commuters? If so, fill out the form below and we’ll send you more details.

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Tell us a little about your run commute! (required)

By | 2017-01-12T09:48:29+00:00 January 12th, 2017|Categories: General, News, People|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

The New Run Commuters – December 2016

Emphasizing TRC’s global reach, this month’s featured runcommuter is James Moore, from London, England. Like our profiled runcommuter from earlier in the year, Julien Delange, James uses runcommuting to train for ultra distance trail races. (Also like Julien–and TRC’s own contributor Nicholas Pedneault–James uses Hoka One One shoes). James says that runcommuting helps him leave work at a reasonable time; the knowledge that he’s going to run home gets him out the door of the office.

On days when he’s catching transport home, he finds it easier to get stuck at work for hours of overtime. An excellent point in favor of runcommuting! As the photos show, most of James’ runcommuting during the winter months is done in the dark. But he doesn’t need to wear a headlamp, as the London streets are so well lit. Our first British runcommuter, Georgia Halls, also mentioned London’s great lighting. Is this the same for you in your winter runcommute? Or are headlamps necessary? Let us know by leaving a comment below.

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Runner Basics

  • Name: James Moore

  • Age: 27

  • City/State: London, England

  • Profession/Employer: Public Health Doctor

  • Number of years running: Ever since school but only properly for the last two years.

  • Number of races you participate in a year: 10-15 marathons and ultras (distances over marathon 42.195km) and multiple smaller parkruns of 5kms.

  • Do you prefer road or trail? Trail.

James Moore

Run Commuting Gear

  • Backpack: Salomon S-Lab Adv Skin 5 Set Hydration Backpack – Black, it’s the same vest I use for all my long runs and has just enough room to carry any clothes I need to take home.

  • Shoes: Hoka OneOne Clifton 2, and a generic Karrimor road shoe.

  • Clothing: I like to try and keep things simple and not overthink this. I do have a few essentials I always use and these tend to be the branded gear. Other than that I tend to wear generic shorts and usually a technical t-shirt from a previous marathon. Karrimor/Nike leggings, Underarmor or Nike warm base layer and CEP compression calf sleeves. These form the key parts of my kit alongside Karrimor sports socks. 

  • Outerwear: I have a few outer shells I rotate and my favorite is an Adidas black parkrun version. I wouldn’t usually use a waterproof as I can just as easily jump in the shower when I get home. I do always carry a light berghaus fleece in case I have to abort the run or it gets uncomfortably cold.

  • Headgear:  Either a lightweight or warm buff dependent on the weather. The run commutes tend to be slow pace so can get a little chilly.

  • Lights: I am lucky/unlucky in that my whole route is lit by street lamps so doesn’t require additional lighting.

  • Hydration: Salomon soft flasks with water or just a bottle of coke/water if I haven’t brought the flasks.

On Run Commuting

Why did you decide to start run commuting?

The main reason for me was efficiency. I wanted to add training into my week and a run commute seemed the easiest way to add miles without sacrificing so much of my spare time it became a burden. A few friends have trained for marathons and ultras in the past and the training really takes up their whole lives, by adding a run commute I can get 20 – 50 extra miles each week with a personal cost of an hour and a half. The fact that this also helps to reduce my personal carbon footprint is an additional bonus.

The other aspect is over the last five years, I’ve gone from a busy and hectic job as a hospital doctor to specializing in public health, a much more sedentary job role. Adding in a run commute ensures my health doesn’t suffer from a less active job.

How often do you run commute?

I’m gradually building up, but currently 2 – 4 times a week on my journey home. I would love to run in the mornings, but unfortunately running to work is simply not possible due to a lack of changing/showers at my current workplace.

How far is your commute?

10 miles is the shortest route if I run the whole way and is almost a straight line. I’m hoping to build this up over the winter by taking a more scenic route to allow me to not worry so much about weekend mileage and improve the training effect of the back-to-back run commutes.

Do you pack or buy a lunch?

I try and bring a packed lunch in most days, as I tend to do my run commute in the evenings which means I have the ability to bring in any food I want for lunch. Tending to go for a salad at lunch, I do sometimes end up with a stash of Tupperware containers in my locker.

What do you like most about run commuting?

The freedom of letting go after work allows you to unwind whilst adding some great training into otherwise wasted commuting time. So many people say they are too busy to train but my run commute takes me maybe 20 minutes longer than by transport and is leading to improved fitness, performance, and mental wellbeing and is infinitely more pleasurable than being packed like sardines in an underground carriage.

I find that sometimes when you are not run commuting you find yourself working later and later in the office, or you keep thinking about work on your journey. When running I have a set time to get out the door and as soon as I’ve started my mind is wandering off into the podcasts I listen to.

Do you know of anyone else in your area that runs to work? 

Being in London it sometimes seems as though everyone cycles or gets the underground, but once you are out on your feet you realise just how many people are out there run commuting. In my public health job, several colleagues also run commute and watching Strava it is clear that more and more people are using the run commute as part of their daily routine and training programme.

When not run commuting, how do you get to work?

When I’m not running, I have a short walk to a bus, a 20 minute bus ride, and then a further 20 minutes on the London underground. I try and ensure I take advantage of the days I don’t run by transporting lunch boxes or clothes home.

If you could give one piece of advice to anyone who was considering run commuting, what would it be?

The biggest problem for me is the planning of the run and working out the problems that you might come up against in running home. I’ve managed to get around this through a few simple changes. I always make sure I have a couple of plastic bags at work so I can wrap up any clothes I may need for the next day to stop them getting wet from rain or sweat. I keep a smart pair of shoes in the office and one at home so meetings the next day can’t prevent a run and I try and ensure I always have a warm ‘running’ layer at work so if I chose to wear something else the cold never stops me.

Anything else that you would like to include?

I regularly tweet and occasionally blog through @mooreultra on twitter and readers can ask further questions or may be interested in future articles and shared content through this.

Are you interested in being featured on The New Run Commuters? If so, fill out the form below and we’ll send you more details.

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Come meet the TRC crew at the Kirkwood Spring Fling 5K!

Attention Atlanta-area runners and run commuters: The TRC team will be at this year’s Kirkwood Spring Fling 5K on Saturday, May 14th!

Not only will several of us be racing the 5K, we’ll also be emceeing parts of the event with our friend Jim Hodgson of The Atlanta Banana.

Sign up for the race and stop by our booth afterwards to say hi to Kyle, Hall, Meghann, and Josh, as we answer your questions and help you learn more about run commuting and active transportation. We’ll have a variety of running backpacks that you can try out as well, including a couple women-specific packs.

We hope to see you there!

Click here to register!

2016 International Run Commuter Survey

The survey is now closed.

Thank you to everyone who participated! Stay tuned for the results…

Welcome to our 2016 International Run Commuter Survey!

Your responses will help the world have a better idea of how many run commuters there are out there, where they run, what gear they use, and how long they’ve been running. Since this is our second survey (the first was in 2014 and you can read about it here) we’re excited to see not only what has changed since we last collected data, but also what trends are emerging from run commuting as a whole.

It doesn’t matter if you stopped run commuting last year, are considering starting, or you are a life-long run commuter, please take the survey and share it wherever you can!

The survey is available in three languages this year! Thanks to Nick Pedneault we have a French version, and the super-cool people at Corridaamiga created a Portuguese version! If you would like to help with the survey by translating it into another language, please send an email to info@theruncommuter.com and let us know. 

 

English Version

Version française

Versão Português

The New Run Commuters – February 2016

Efficiency is the watchword for Julien Delange, our first run commuter profile for 2016. Running to and from his workplace in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Julien favours maximalist shoes, and structures his run commuting — in both principles and pragmatics — for greatest efficiency. In his profile, Julien also highlights the positive environmental, financial and training benefits of running to work. With his routine sorted, Julien run commutes high-mileage weeks as training for the trail races he enters. His commitment to leaving the car at home (“the car is simply not an option during the week“) is an inspiration to all run commuters. As if all this wasn’t enough, Julien maintains an active blog, complete with his own posts on run commuting – check it out after you read his profile! 

As always, if you are interested in being featured in The New Run Commuters, contact us using the form at the end of this post. The only criteria we have is that you started run commuting sometime in the last year or so. 

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Runner Basics

  • Name: Julien Delange

  • Age: 32

  • City/State: Pittsburgh, PA

  • Profession/Employer: Researcher in Computer Science

  • Number of years running: 7

  • Number of races you participate in a year: stopped counting (list on my blog, here

  • Do you prefer road or trail? Definitely trails. With a weekly mileage between 50 and 120 miles, long runs on flat and paved roads increase the likelihood to get an injury, so I prefer to stay on trails.

New Run Commuter Julien Delange

Run Commuting Gear

  • Backpack: I mostly use two backpacks: the Ultraspire Ultraviz Spry when I do not have to bring anything or REI Stoke 9 when I take clothes or food. 

  • Shoes: Hoka Huaka were the best! Unfortunately, Hoka One One discontinued them and my attempt to convince them to keep these shoes in their catalog was a miserable failure. So, I just use any Hoka One One shoe (special kudos to the Stinson Lite) 

  • Lights: A Black Diamond Revolt headlamp that I can charge on a mini-USB port. Very useful during winter, when days are short and it is dark when you leave home and come back at night: you can charge it at work when you arrive in the morning at work, so that you are sure you have enough batteries for both trips.

  • Hydration: I used to take a bottle, but over the last year my body has become used to commuting without drinking. Otherwise, when running more than 20 miles, I use a Nathan backpack with a bladder.

  • Clothing: Nothing special or fancy: a pair of shorts, a tech t-shirt, some tech socks (Smartwool or Injini) and that’s about it. I also have a protective shell (for when it rains), headband (to protect my ears from freezing during winter). It is useless to overdress: after 10 minutes, my body is warm enough to run under the snow. And even having Raynaud syndrome that reduces blood flow in my extremities, I keep clothing as minimal as possible. The most difficult part is remembering to keep going for the first 10 minutes when it’s freezing cold outside! 

  • Outerwear: Salomon Agile ½ Zip and Salomon Trail Runner Warm LS Zip Tee. Only when it is really cold!

  • Headgear: A hat when it is really hot, but otherwise, nothing. I also always wear protective goggles or sunglasses when going on trails – to protect my eyes from potential obstacles.

On Run Commuting

Why did you decide to start run commuting?

Efficiency, sustainability, and financial reasons. Two years ago, I was taking my car to go to work (one hour per day), running one hour a day, and going to the gym. All these activities took two to three hours every day.

It was not time-efficient. I decided to run to work (45 min. each way) so that I could have more time to do other things I enjoy (reading, programming, playing, meeting friends!) and save money (no gas or parking). In addition, I would not be increasing the pollution (fumes and noise) in my community. I realized there were only benefits and suddenly became a run commuter the morning after.

How often do you run commute?

Every day! And I still do my long runs during the weekend :-)

I am very lucky that we have a shower at work: I bring soap, clean clothes and towels every two weeks to work, so that I do not have to carry them in my backpack.

How far is your commute?

The commute is between 4.5 (shortest route) to 10 miles (scenic view along a river). I have many routes I can take, so that I can adapt my commute according to my training needs (elevation, distance, mileage, etc.) I usually run between 10 to 13 miles a day with some days at more than 20 (when training for very long distances). It really is a fantastic way to train!

The sun rising over the river during Julien’s run to work

Do you pack or buy a lunch?

I already have all my lunches prepared at work. Every two or three weeks, I drop a lot of clothes and packaged food. I eat the same thing almost every day: NuGo bars for snack and Tasty Bite Madras Lentils packages for lunches. Tasty Bites are easy to prepare (one minute in a microwave), are acceptable from a nutrition point of view (has some carbs, protein, etc.). It is very efficient from both time and financial perspectives. And, sometimes, I still go out for lunch with some colleagues.

What do you like most about run commuting?

This is a very efficient way to train: you can adapt your route according to what you really need to do (hill repeats, fartleks, etc.) and give yourself extra time for other activities. This is actually the best way I have found to train for long distances without impacting my social life too much. Also, you cannot miss a run!

Another underrated aspect is the predictability. Drive-commute times depend on many variables (traffic, issues with your car, etc.) and you do not have control over them. By running and choosing your route, you know exactly how long it is going to take to go to work.

But overall, I just do not like driving! To me, running is more natural than driving and the idea of sitting in traffic for hours is just not appealing. I prefer to be outside enjoying nature.

Do you know of anyone else in your area that runs to work?

Actually, there are some people that recently started commuting in Pittsburgh (special kudos to Alyssa and Sarah!). Pittsburgh is becoming more biker and runner friendly. We now have bike lanes, some dedicated fitness events for bikers and runners, and plenty of local running groups. The biggest running group in the city (Steel City Road Runner) started 3 or 4 years ago and today has more than 2000 members. Only a few of us run to work, but more people are getting involved and being active, this is what matters!

Beyond the decision to run to work, what matters to me is how we, as a society, use our resources (time, land, money, etc). Today, more than 76% of the US population go to work alone in their cars. In 2012, less than 3% of the population walked to work. Transportation impacts so many aspects of our community: schedule (time to commute and stay in traffic), health (pollution, noise, risks related to inactivity), even architecture (organization of the city with more roads). Choosing the least efficient solutions has a huge impact: does it make sense to take our car to work for a couple of miles when we can just bike/walk/run there? Especially considering the impact of the lack of activity in our developed societies.

Run commuting is just a means to change the way we usually commute, and there are other alternatives if you would prefer not to run (bike, public transportation, carpool, etc.), It is a good thing to see that some cities (such as Pittsburgh) are developing and promoting other ways of commuting.

When not run commuting, how do you get to work?

I only stop running to work when I am injured. In that case, I commute either by bike or (last resort) bus. The car is simply not an option during the week.

If you could give one piece of advice to anyone who was considering run commuting, what would it be?

Start easy and do it progressively. It takes a while to build the endurance to commute every day, but it is very convenient. Have fun, enjoy it. Stop half way to the pub, meet some friends, grab a beer. (re)Discover your city, its trails, and just have fun!

Anything else that you would like to include?

I maintain a blog about running and had several articles on run commuting. Readers might be interested by the introduction to run commuting! http://julien.gunnm.org/2015/02/05/running-as-a-transportation-alternative-the-introductory-guide/

Interested in being featured on The New Run Commuters? Submit your info in the form below and we’ll send you more details.

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The New Run Commuters Submission Form

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Run Commuting Manual Now Available!

Several months ago, we were asked to help put together a run commuting manual by our good friend Silvia, founder of Brazil’s number one run commuting website, Corridiaamiga. Silvia and some fellow Brazilian runners, nutritionists, and fitness leaders decided to create a booklet to explain the logistics and idea behind run commuting to those whom were interested in learning more about it. After several months of work, the manual was complete and published just in time for Silvia to present the case for Running as a Mode of Transportation to the Congress of Urban Mobility in Sao Paulo, Brazil!

The manual was originally written in Portuguese, and then translated into English. Both versions are available below, as well as under our “Become a Run Commuter” section on the website dropdown menu.

By | 2016-10-22T20:26:30+00:00 July 14th, 2015|Categories: How To, News, BecomingARunCommuter|0 Comments

In the News: Nine reasons why running to work beats the train

Here’s a nice, concise piece about run commuting that recently ran in the UK’s Telegraph. One of the best parts: 

6. You’ll avoid talking to strangers on the train

Let’s be honest: no one wants to hear about their fellow commuter’s bunion surgery while travelling on the 7.53.

 

Aside from the fact that your legs are unlikely to go on strike as often as National Rail, run commuting boasts a number of key benefits

Source: Nine reasons why running to work beats the train

By | 2015-05-31T14:32:44+00:00 May 31st, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on In the News: Nine reasons why running to work beats the train

Can You Run Faster Than a Car? Run the Beat the Commute Race and Find Out  – Be Well Philly

The other day, I got out of a cab that had been stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffic for a good 10 minutes, because I figured it would take me less time to walk where I was going than to drive there — and the thought that you can get places faster by foot is the idea of the…

Source: Can You Run Faster Than a Car? Run the Beat the Commute Race and Find Out  – Be Well Philly

Thanks to Cathy B. for sending this our way!

By | 2015-05-08T10:14:33+00:00 May 8th, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Can You Run Faster Than a Car? Run the Beat the Commute Race and Find Out  – Be Well Philly
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